Comics of the World

An attempt at a useful new page. A list of countries and the comics they produce. This is still in it’s very early stages! I’m going to need a lot of help from people who are knowledgeable about such things.
I’m looking for basic info, and ideally a cover pic, of the most significant comics (including story papers, ‘penny dreadfuls’ and ‘graphic novels’) from specific countries. Ideally they should be ones that are native to that country, though comics based on foreign material can be included if they are very popular, or played some significant role in the development of that country’s own comics.
Comics that have ended should also be included, if they had a lot of cultural significance in their time. For instance The Magnet and Eagle in Britain.

Afghanistan

Albania

Algeria

Andorra

Angola

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Belarus

Belgium

Spirou

(pic)

Duration: XXXX – Present

Frequency:

Publisher:

Type: Comic – Comedy / Adventure anthology

Size: A4

Famous for: Les Schtroumpfs (The Smurfs)

Notes: Long-running Belgian comic, also widely sold in France.

 

Belize

Benin

Bhutan

Bolivia

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Strip Magazin

(pic)

Duration:

Frequency: Beleived monthly

Publisher: Print Media

Type: Comic – Adventure anthology

Size: A4

Famous for:

Notes: A “British version” is published as Strip Magazine, but also contains new stories by British creators.

 

Botswana

Brazil

Brunei

Bulgaria

Burkina Faso

Burma

Burma

Burundi

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Chile

Condorito

wo-condorito

Duration: 1949 – present

Frequency:

Publisher: United Features Syndicate / Universal Press Syndicate

Type: Compilations of newspaper strips, with some originals.

Size: “A4”

Famous for:

Notes: The most famous Chilean comic, there is a statue of Condorito in Santiago. A Condorito strip runs in a newspaper, but Condorito comics are also published, with strips of different sizes and lengths. Almost every strip ends with a character falling over with a “¡Plop!” sound effect.

 

China

Columbia

Cormoros

Costa Rica

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Denmark

Dijibouti

Dominica

Dominican Republic

East Timor

Ecuador

Egypt

Toktok

(pic)

Duration: Since January 2013 (estimated)

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher:

Type: Mixed humour / adventure / politics / slice of life etc

Size:

Famous for:

Notes: Apparently Egypt’s first indigenous comic. There may have been others during colonial times, or propaganda books produced under the past dictatorships.

 

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Ethiopia

Fiji

Finland

Korkeajännitys

(pic)

Duration: X – Present

Frequency:

Publisher:

Type: Comic – War / Adventure anthology

Size: Paperback size

Famous for:

Notes: Finnish repackaging of Britain’s Commando comics, in 3-in-one books.

 

France

Gabon

Gambia

Gay Kingdom of the Coral Sea

Georgia

Germany

Wendy

(pic)

Duration:

Frequency:

Publisher:

Type: Comic – Comedy / Light Adventure anthology

Size: A4(?)

Famous for:

Notes: All stories are horse-themed. Some dolls (like Sindy) are sold in Germany as “Wendy” instead.

 

Der Landser

(pic)

Duration: 1957 – 2013

Frequency: Monthly(?)

Publisher: Bauer Media

Type: Story Paper – war stories / factual articles

Size: A5(?)

Famous for: Allegedly “whitewashing German history” because it features “plain” war stories, without the soldiers engaging in stilted conversations about how terrible the holocaust is (did the ordinary soldiers on the front lines even know it was happening?).

Notes: Forced to close in 2013 after a smear campaign by British tabloids.

 

Ghana

Greece

Grenada

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea-Bassau

Guyana

Haiti

Honduras

Hungary

Iceland

India

Tinkle

(pic)

Duration: 1947 – present

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher: Amar Chitra Katha

Type: Comic (possibly also text stories) – Mixed anthology

Size:

Famous for:

Notes: One of the earliest indigenous Indian comics, began just before independence from Britain.

 

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Diabolik

(pic)

Duration: 1962 – Present

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher: Astroina

Type: Comic – crime / mystery / adventure

Size: “Diabolik format” 12 x 17cm

Famous for: Probably best-known in the English speaking world as a film, Danger: Diabolik, which was parodied on the show Mystery Science Theater 3000

Notes: Long-running Italian series, there appears to be several different Diabolik books issued monthly, the main series has run for over 800 issues. “Diabolik R” has clocked up over 600. There’s also Diabolik Swisss, named after the sound of a thrown knife.


Julia – le avventure di una criminologa

(pic)

Duration: 1998 – present

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher: Sergio Bonelli Editore

Type: Comic – detective

Size: Roughly A5

Famous for:

Notes: A popular Italian detective series, reached issue 200 in 2015, with a full colour issue (as was issue 100). Set in America.


 

Nat Pinkerton

nat_pinkerton

Picture Credit: The Steam Man of the West https://www.facebook.com/thesteamman

Duration: XXXX

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: XXXX

Type: Story Paper – detective

Size: XXXX (appears half tabloid)

Famous for: Different editions were published all over Europe, including in Russia both before and after the revolution (post-revolution versions, and the anxiety of the new government about them, led to the creation of communism-focused “Red Pinkertons”). A film was made in Germany, in 1920.

Notes: APPEARS to have been originally Italian, though it’s set in the USA. The Steam Man of the West page doesn’t mention a “translator”, when talking about these, as it does for others. May turn out to have originated in the USA (or Germany!)

Ivory Coast

Jamaica

Japan

Shonen Jump

IMG_20160727_102830797

Duration: 1968 – present

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Shueisha

Type: Comic – Mixed anthology

Size: “Large manga” (compiled stories are printed at just under half the size)

Famous for: Speed Racer, Kochikame, Dragonball Z, Naruto, One Piece, Death Note, Bleach

Notes: Also known as “Weekly Jump”, to differentiate it from a past “Monthly Shonen Jump”, and various other publications to carry the Jump Name. Colloquially referred to as “Jump”, it is far and away the most popular comic in Japan. Weekly sales remain steady at over a million, even in the twenty-first century, making it the best-selling comic anywhere in the world, at present. Many of the stories have been turned into animation, videogames and films. Compiled books of the most famous stories are now sold all over the world.


 

Ribon

(pic)

Duration: 1955 – Present

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher: Shueisha

Type: Comic – Mixed Anthology

Size:

Famous for: Sakura-Hime

Notes: A 1975 issue achieved sales of over 7.5 million, making it the best-selling issue of a Japanese anthology ever (many complied books, which remain “in print” until they sell, do not reach this figure). Current sales have dropped to around 240,000. Note – the preceding claim is now “unsourced”. I read it on a now-altered display at the Kyoto International Manga Museum in 2012. The display was talking about the “best selling manga”, but does not differentiate between the weekly / monthly anthologies, and the on-sale-until-sold tankobon books. Now 10 of those have exceeeded sales of 7.6 million, pushing Ribon off the bottom of the top 10 list!


 

King

wo-king

Duration: 1924 – 1944 / XXXX

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher:

Type: Story Paper – Mixed anthology (few humour strips)

Size: “Medium Manga” (roughly A5)

Famous for:

Notes: First Japanese magazine to sell over a million. The original version was cancelled in 1944, to save paper. It returned after the war.

 

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Kosovo

Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan

Laos

Latvia

Lebanon

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Lichtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Macedonia

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Lat

(pic)

Duration: 1977 – XXXX

Frequency: Occasional

Publisher: Berita Publishing

Type: Comic – Comedy

Size: XXXX (variable? A4 landscape?)

Famous for: Most famous “comic” “series” in Malaysia. The author was ranked fourth in a “most trustworthy celebrity” survey by a Malaysian newspaper.

Notes: A series of books, mainly compiled newspaper cartoons, or autobiographical accounts (“The Kampung Boy” and “Town Boy”). The Kampung Boy, especially, has been translated into many languages, and sold around the world.

 

Maldives

Mali

Malta

Marshall Islands

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mexico

Micronesia

Moldova

Monaco

Mongolia

Montenegro

Morocco

Mozambique

Namibia

Nauru

Nepal

Netherlands

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

North Korea

Great General Mighty Wing

MightyWing

Credit: http://sfac.wustl.edu/node/2345

Duration: 1994

Frequency: One-off publication (probably)

Publisher: Gold Star Children’s Press

Type: Graphic Novel

Size: (Manga size?)

Famous for:

Notes: Blatantly stuffed with anti-Japanese (wasps) and Western / South Korean (spiders) propaganda. Of course.

 

Adong Munhak

IMG_20160727_100910100

Duration: Since at least 1967

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher: XXXX

Type: Story paper, anthology

Size: XXXX

Famous for: mentioned in some academic review of North Korean sci-fi / popular literature.

Notes: The name means “Childrens Literature”.

 

Choseon Munhak

(pic)

Duration: XXXX

Frequency: Presumed monthly

Publisher: XXXX

Type: Story paper, anthology

Size: Presumed tabloid, half tabloid, or A4

Famous for: mentioned in some academic review of North Korean sci-fi / popular literature.

Notes: Apparently a “major literary magazine” in the country.

 

Norway

Oman

Pakistan

Palau

Palestine

Panama

Papua New Guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Qatar

Republic of the Congo

Romania

Russia

Rwanda

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa

San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Sealand

Senegal

Serbia

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

Solomon Islands

Somalia

South Africa

South Korea

South Sudan

Soviet Union

Mess Mend

mess_mend

Image source: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/172262754471860886/

Duration: 10 weeks in 1924

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: XXXX

Type: “Penny” Dreadful – serialised partwork

Size: XXXX

Famous for: Apparently the most famous of the “Red Pinkertons”. Was extremely popular in the early days of the Soviet Union, until “dumbed down” literature, which “distracts the working class”, such as detective novels, were suppressed.

Notes: Has been translated into several other languages, and remains “in print”, though hardly well-known (outside Russia).

Spain

Sri Lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Swaziland

Sweden

Swedish section created with information from Michael Eriksson: http://trinkelbonker.wordpress.com/

 

Helgonet

(pic)

Duration: 1966 – 1985

Frequency: (monthly?)

Publisher:

Type: Adventure (anthology?)

Size:

Famous for: New, Swedish-made comic strips about The Saint (Roger Moore TV version)

Notes: Scripts for the stories were all ‘screened’ by Leslie Charteris, creator of The Saint.


 

Buffalo

(pic)

Duration: 1965 – 1984

Frequency:

Publisher:

Type: Comic – Western

Size: American(?)

Famous for: Swedish-made stories about Buffalo Bill, the famous frontier scout who featured in many (made-up!) stories around the world.

Notes: Began as foreign reprints, but later featured new stories.

 

Switzerland

Syria

Taiwan

Tajikistan

Tanzania

Thailand

Togo

Tonga

Transinistra

Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia

Turkey

Turkey (Ottoman Empire)

Engizisyon Mezalimi

engizisyon_mezalimi

Picture Credit: The Steam Man of the West https://www.facebook.com/thesteamman

Duration: XXXX

Frequency: Weekly(?)

Publisher: Constitutional Matbassi

Type: “Penny” Dreadful – partwork containing one story

Size: XXXX

Famous for: Only Ottoman empire one I know of the existence of!

Notes: The name means “Atrocities of the Inquisition”. Written in Persian.


 

Turkmenistan

Tuvalu

Uganda

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom

The Beano

wo-beano

Duration: 1938 – Present

Frequency: Weekly (fortnightly during most of 1940’s)

Publisher: DC Thomson

Type: Comic – Humour Anthology (occasional adventure strip or text story)

Size: Half Tabloid / “A4”

Famous for: Dennis the Menace, Minnie the Minx, The Bash Street Kids, Roger the Dodger Ivy the Terrible, The Numskulls

Notes: Britain’s longest-running comic, having overtaken the cancelled Dandy.


 

The Dandy

(pic)

Duration: 1937 – 2012

Frequency: Weekly (fortnightly during most of 1940’s, and from 2007 – 2010)

Publisher: DC Thomson

Type: Comic – Humour Anthology (occasional adventure strip or text story)

Size: Half Tabloid / “A4”

Famous for: Desperate Dan, Korky the Cat, Winker Watson, Brassneck, Bananaman

Notes: Underwent major ‘overhauls’ in 2002, 2007 (becoming Dandy Extreme) and 2010. The paper version ended on it’s 75th birthday in 2012. A bug-ridden digital version began at around the same time, but was re-launched once, and then cancelled, within six months. Holds the British Sales record for a weekly comic, over 2 million sales of one issue in 1950.


Viz

(pic)

Duration: 1979 – present

Frequency: Currently 10 times a year

Publisher: Self-Published / John Brown Books / Dennis Publishing

Type: Comedy Anthology / Adventure Parody / Satirical Articles

Size: Half Tabloid / “A4”

Famous for: Roger Mellie, Biffa Bacon, The Fat Slags, Johnny Fartpants, Sid the Sexist, The Thieving Gypsy B******s, Harold & Fred (They Make Ladies Dead)

Notes: First 12 issues self-published through punk gigs, independent record shops etc. From 13 onwards published nationally. “Thieving Gypsies” strip led to accusations of racism. “Harold & Fred” caused controversy by making jokes about famous serial killers. Many parodies of DC Thomson characters led to threats of legal action, so Viz parodied DC Thomson as a publisher, leading to a ‘response’ published in the form of a “Jocks and the Geordies” strip in The Dandy (Viz is made in Newcastle).


Commando

wo-commando

Duration: 1961 – present

Frequency: 2, 4, 6 and from 1971 8 issues a month (4 every 2 weeks)

Publisher: DC Thomson

Type: Comic – War / Adventure, complete stories

Size: Digest

Famous for: Being the most popular of the many war-themed picture library comics. So much so that “Commando” has become a generic term for all of them.

Notes: Almost all stories are about World War 2, though from the 1980’s stories about other wars and time periods were added. 2 annuals produced in 1989 and 1990, in “colour”(ish). From 2006, large format 10/12 story compliation books were produced. More recently a series of 3-in-one paperback-sized reprints are being produced.


Eagle

(pic)

Duration: 1950 – 1969 / 1982 – 1995

Frequency: Weekly (second version monthly from approximately 1990)

Publisher: Hulton Press (to 1960) / Odhams (to a bit later in 1960) / IPC (1960 onwards)

Type: Comic – Adventure anthology (some comedy strips). First version also had a few text stories. Both versions had educational articles.

Size: Tabloid (first version), Half-tabloid / “A4” (second version)

Famous for: Dan Dare

Notes: The early version is regularly called “the best British comic” (though I personally prefer The Boys’ Friend from 1895 – 1926 XD). It was originally created to oppose American-made crime and horror comics, with stories of upstanding Christian morality set within boys’ own adventures. Once IPC gained control Eagle lost it’s way “somewhat”, becoming more of an ordinary adventure comic – near the end, it even contained American reprints! The second version was merged with many comics through the mid-late 1980’s, taking on board various strange characters. In the 90’s, it went monthly, before finally failing around 1994. Britain won’t see the like again!


2000AD

(pic)

Duration: 1977 – Present

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: IPC / Rebellion

Type: Comic – Sci Fi anthology

Size: Half Tabloid / “A4”

Famous for: Judge Dredd, Ro-Busters/ABC Warriors, Invasion/Savage, The Ballad of Halo Jones

Notes: Began as nothing more than a quick cash-in on the upcoming Star Wars craze (it was released in the UK significantly later than in the USA), jokingly named 2000AD because it was not expected to last that long. Ended up becoming hugely popular in it’s own right, mainly thanks to Judge Dredd, and has now long-outlived it’s “expiry date”. Also played host to several early Alan Moore short stories.


 

Union Jack

(pic)

Duration: 1894 – 1933 (‘became’ Detective Weekly, until 1940)

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Harmsworth Publishing / Amalgamated Press

Type: Story Paper – Detective / Adventure stories

Size: Half Tabloid

Famous for: Sexton Blake

Notes: Sexton Blake first appeared in The Halfpenny Marvel in late 1893. He was moved to Union Jack in 1894 and appeared infrequently (the main story was always self contained in each issue). In 1904 he began to appear in every issue. From about 1919 the stories began to be arranged in ‘series’, with the battle against a particular villain spread out over 3-5 issues at a time, though each story was still complete. From late 1894 at least one serial story ran alongside the main feature, sometimes the writers of the serials were bigger names than the writer of the main story! From around 1920 articles about police work and famous criminal cases began to appear.


 

The Magnet

(pic)

Duration: 1908 – 1940

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Amalgamated Press

Type: Story Paper – School / Adventure

Size: Half-tabloid

Famous for: Billy Bunter

Notes: Every issue featured a long story about Greyfriars public school, with Billy Bunter playing a pivotal role in almost every plot! Also contained more general adventure serials. The boys of Greyfriars never aged, though the world changed around them (they were at school during both World Wars!). Paper shortages resulted in abrupt cancellation in 1940.


 

Roy of the Rovers

wo-roy

Duration: 1976 – 1995

Frequency: Weekly (monthly from 1993)

Publisher: IPC

Type: Comic – Football anthology

Size: Half Tabloid / “A4”

Famous for: Roy of the Rovers, a long and ongoing story about Roy Race, and his team Melchester Rovers. Other football strips came and went, some of them having very long runs.

Notes: “Roy of the Rovers stuff” is still used by football commentators to describe amazing play and “fairytale” comebacks.


The People’s Friend

(pic)

Duration: 1869 – Present

Frequency: Weekly (possibly fortnightly during the 1940’s)

Publisher: DC Thomson

Type: Story Paper – Romance / Kitchen Sink drama

Size: Half Tabloid / “A4”

Famous for:

Notes: The longest running story paper in the world (probably). Mainly aimed at old ladies todday, though may have had a more general “family” readership earlier in life.


 

Misty

(pic)

Duration: 1978 – 1980

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: IPC

Type: Comic – horror anthology

Size: Half tabloid

Famous for: Moonchild, The Sentinels

Notes: A horror comic for girls with a lot of ‘be careful what you wish for’ type stories. Actually inspired by DC Thomson’s short-lived Spellbound, it has maintained a cult following long after it ended.


Victor

(pic)

Duration: 1961 – 1992

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: DC Thomson

Type: Comic – Adventure anthology

Size: Half Tabloid

Famous for: Alf Tupper, Wilson, I Flew with Braddock, Gorgeous Gus, The Hammer Man, The Wolf of Kabul

Notes: DC Thomson’s longest-running adventure comic. Many of it’s most famous characters began in older text story papers, which were re-made as comics in Victor. In later days several characters were “imported” from merged comics, for instance Hornet, Champ and The Crunch.


Comic Cuts

(pic)

Duration: 1890 – XXXX

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Harmsworth / Amalgamated Press

Type: Comic – Comedy anthology (also with text stories in early days)

Size:

Famous for: One of Britain’s longest running comics. One of the earliest to be primarily focused on comedy strips and cartoons.

Notes: One of the first successful publications from Alfred Harmsworth, who would go on to dominate the comic and story paper scene from the 1890’s to 1920’s. His Amalgamated Press would later evolve into Fleetway publications, which still exists today.


 

Girls’ Crystal

(pic)

Duration: 1935 -1963

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Amalgamated Press

Type: Story paper (primarily comic strips from 21st March 1953)

Size: Slightly smaller than half-tabloid (smaller still during the war)

Famous for: Noel Raymond

Notes: Long-running story paper for girls. Unusually it was allowed to keep running through the war, when even The Magnet and Gem were cancelled. Early annuals were text only, but started to feature strips when they appeared in the weekly. The annuals outlived the comic for many years, running to at least 1976


 

The String of Pearls (Sweeney Todd)

(pic)

Duration: 1846 – 1847 (as “The String of Pearls”)

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Edward Lloyd

Type: Penny Dreadful

Size:

Famous for: Many later adaptions as other serials, books, plays and films

Notes: Originally a short serial in The People’s Periodical and Family Library, it was later re-published in a much longer form as “A String of Pearls, or The Sailor’s Gift”. This version was pirated several times (and it was one of these copies that was named Sweeney Todd). The original story was reprinted by Wordsworth Editions in the 21st century.


Varney the Vampyre

(pic)

Duration: 1845 – 1847

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Edward Lloyd

Type: Penny dreadful

Size:

Famous for:

Notes: Long running vampire story, which introduced many tropes of vampire stories that were later re-used in Dracula (from 1897).


TV Century 21 (later TV21)

(pic)

Duration: 1965 – 1969

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: City Magazines

Type: Comic – adventure anthology

Size: Tabloid

Famous for: Thunderbirds, Captain Scarlet, Stingray, Fireball XL5, Supercar, The Daleks

Notes: Large format, high-quality comic that was initially anchored around Gerry Anderson stories (Gerry Anderson being, arguably, the “British Walt Disney”), often giving them a more solidly-defined “universe” than the contemporary TV shows. It also featured a noted strip about The Daleks, which gave them a backstory not seen in Doctor Who until much later. Later the comic moved the Gerry Anderson material into black and white pages, and gave ‘top billing’ to Star Trek. It was finally merged with IPC’s Valiant.


Ally Sloper’s Half Holiday

(pic)

Duration: 1884 – 1916

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Gilbert Dalziel

Type: Comic – humour anthology

Size: Tabloid

Famous for: Being the “first British comic”. Earlier primarily-comic-focused magazines have since been found, but Ally Sloper was the first to feature a regular character in strips in every issue.

Notes: Also contained a lot of satirical text material alongside other cartoons and short strips. It bore a closer resemblance to Private Eye than any modern comic.


Bunty

(PIC)

Duration: 1958 – 2001

Frequency: Weekly (last five issues in 2001 monthly)

Publisher: DC Thomson

Type: Comic – mixed anthology

Size: Half tabloid / “A4”

Famous for: The Four Marys, The Comp, Moira Drake

Notes: One of the longest-running British comics for girls, annuals continued further into the 2000’s.


Girl

(pic)

Duration: 1951 – 1964

Frequency: Weekly

Publisher: Hulton (to 1959), Odhams (to 1963), IPC

Type: Comic – mixed anthology

Size: Tabloid

Famous for: Kitty Hawke, Wendy & Jinx

Notes: A comic for girls published by the same company as Eagle, with similarly high production values. A version of Girl was re-launched in the 1980’s, but it was a magazine.

 

United States of America

Action Comics

(pic)

Duration: 1938 – present

Frequency: Monthly (weekly for a short time)

Publisher: DC Comics

Type: Single-Story Series (mixed anthology in early issues)

Size: American

Famous for: Superman

Notes: Superman featured in issue 1, and returned as a permanent fixture in issue 19. The anthology style was soon dropped in favour of just Superman. Re-numbered in 2011 as part of the “New 52”.


 

Detective Comics

(pic)

Duration: 1937 – present

Frequency: Monthly (reduced to bi-monthly and 8 times a year at points. Due to wartime shortages?)

Publisher: DC Comics

Type: Single-Story Series (adventure anthology in early issues)

Size: American

Famous for: Batman

Notes: Originally an anthology comic with detective / adventure stories. Batman first appeared in issue 27, a copy of which sold for $1.75 million in 2010 (the most expensive comic in the world). The anthology format was dropped in favour of Batman stories (at times with a non-Batman backup strip). Re-numbered in 2011 as part of the “New 52”.


 

V for Vendetta

(pic)

Duration: 1982 – 1985 (Warrior), 1988 – 1989 (DC)

Frequency: Weekly / Monthly

Publisher: Quality Comics / DC Comics

Type: Comic / Graphic Novel

Size: American

Famous for: One of Alan Moore’s most famous works

Notes: Originally British, it was published in an irregular anthology called Warrior. This only printed about half the story before being cancelled (and it was in black and white). It was later published by DC Comics in an American format, and completed. The American version was also in colour. This version was then collected as a graphic novel, and it is in this form that most people have read it.


Watchmen

(pic)

Duration: 1986 – 1987

Frequency: Monthly

Publisher: DC Comics

Type: Comic – superhero series / Graphic Novel

Size: American

Famous for: One of the most famous “graphic novel” type comics. Regarded as Alan Moore’s masterpiece

Notes: Published as a monthly comic series, then as a collected book, which is the form in which most people have read the stories. In 2012 a series of prequels about individual characters appeared.


Nick Carter Library

nick_carter_library

Picture Credit: The Steam Man of the West https://www.facebook.com/thesteamman

Duration: XXXX

Frequency: Presumed weekly

Publisher: Street & Smith

Type: Story Paper

Size: Tabloid (appears to be!)

Famous for: Nick Carter was “America’s Sherlock Holmes”, though he was more like America’s Sexton Blake! Appeared in thousands of stories, over many different publications.

Notes: There were other Nick Carter story papers, including the later “New Nick Carter Weekly”, with colour covers. I don’t know which one was most famous, so just picked this one!

 

 

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanatu

Vatican

Venezuela

Vietnam

Yemen

Yugoslavia

Zambia

Zimbabwe

 

Template:

Title

(pic)

Duration:

Frequency:

Publisher:

Type:

Size:

Famous for:

Notes:

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